New book: Saving Africa from Lies that Kill – now you can help end the misery

The Book: Saving Africa from Lies that Kill: How Myths about the Environment and Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries.

Now you can help end the unnecessary misery in Africa and other developing countries. No, not just by throwing money at the problem; rather, you can help advocate to end the stagnation caused by outdated wrong attitudes and practices. Africa needs Education, Employment, Investment, Infrastructure and Disease Control to bring them into the 21st century. Africa can grow new burgeoning markets, a source of new goods, new business opportunities and a new workforce for existing businesses, which can break the hold of Chinese goods and services. Investment, rather than foreign aid to corrupt governments is the key, as well as ending counterproductive practices by international organizations.

From the back cover:   How Myths about the Environment and overpopulation are destroying third world countries

In Saving Africa From Lies That Kill, Kay Kiser exposes the long-standing crimes committed against developing nations by the United Nations, World Bank, USAID and Planned Parenthood. Under their guise of “aid,” these organizations mire the underprivileged in isolation, poverty, sickness, and ignorance. In her book, Kiser argues:

  • Poverty, not overpopulation, causes environmental damage. Higher standards of living and lower infant mortality can improve the environment and stabilize the population.
  • Developing nations need access to reliable electricity in order to end energy poverty. This will, in turn, provide clean water, develop transportation, and power hospitals, homes and industrial investment.
  • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re weakened from malaria, parasites and dysentery. They need insect and disease control for a healthy workforce.
  • The Green Revolution and modern agriculture can feed everyone and end deforestation.

Fortunately, you can do something about the problem–and Kiser shows you how.

********************************************

Available online and in book stores everywhere. In print and eBook through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million.  Note: some bookstores may not have it yet, but asking for them to order it for you will help to get it on the shelves faster.

After reading the book, please remember to review it online; share it with a friend and do your part to end bad practices. Visit my blog for more information to sign up for email updates at https://savingafricafromliesthatkill.com/  , and like my Facebook page.

 

Is the world overpopulated?

The Overpopulation Myth – 200+ years of doom and gloom

Who says the world is overpopulated? And what does that mean anyway? Hunger?  Crowding? Environmental harm?  For over 200 years we’ve been told that the world is overpopulated. But is it? Check this out.

In 1798, Thomas Malthus thought the world was overpopulated when world population was under one billion. He wanted to deny aid to the poor in his country and praised malaria for keeping the death rate high and life spans short in Africa and other developing countries. He saw disease, famine and war as good things to reduce population.  His philosophy, which prompted Britain to pass laws against helping the Irish, was responsible for a million deaths in the Irish potato famine while still exporting wheat from Ireland to Britain. Malthus made two major erroneous assumptions: no improvements in crop yields per acre and the genetic inferiority, enhanced fertility and inability of the poor to improve their economic status.  He was wrong.

 “Instead of recommending cleanliness to the poor, we should encourage contrary habits. In our towns we should make the streets narrower, crowd more people into the houses, and court the return of the plague. In the country, we should build our villages near stagnant pools, and particularly encourage settlements in all marshy and unwholesome situations. But above all, we should reprobate specific remedies for ravaging diseases; and restrain those benevolent, but much mistaken men, who have thought they were doing a service to mankind by projecting schemes for the total extirpations of particular disorders.”  

                     —Thomas Malthus, An Essay on the Principles of Population, 1798       

When world population was about 1.3 billion, Charles Darwin, whose Theory of Evolution was based on Malthus’ book, thought the struggle for survival would cause the extinction of underdeveloped cultures by developed peoples. He was wrong.

 “At some future period, not very distant as measured in centuries, the civilized races of man will almost certainly exterminate and replace the savage races throughout the world.”

                                                            —Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man, 1871

Francis Galton, creator of Eugenics, the so-called science of improving the human race, thought the African races were so inferior genetically that Chinese should be settled in Africa to drive the Negro races to extinction and replace them. He was wrong.

“My proposal is to make the encouragement of the Chinese settlements at one or more suitable places on the East Coast of Africa a part of our national policy, in the belief that the Chinese immigrants would not only maintain their position, but that they would multiply and their descendants supplant the inferior Negro race.”

                        — The Times, June 5, 1873, “Africa for the Chinese,” Francis Galton

The Eugenics movement in Britain and America wanted to reduce the population by preventing procreation by “genetically inferior” people, including sterilization and institutionalization. The Eugenics movement influenced policies that limited immigration based on racial and ethnic background because of the assumed genetic inferiority of certain races and cultures.

Around 1920 when the population was about 1.9 billion, Margaret Sanger, founder of Planned Parenthood and a prominent eugenicist, believed we needed to get rid of “human weeds,” including dark skinned people from Southern Europe, Africa and India as well as the mentally or physically impaired.  She counted among them the generationally poor and criminals.  She advocated for sterilization and birth control, and later for abortion. She was wrong.

  “The most serious charge that can be brought against modern benevolence is that it encourages the perpetuation of defectives, delinquents and dependents. These are the most dangerous elements in the world community, the most devastating curse on human progress and expression.”

                                                — Margaret Sanger in The Pivot of Civilization, 1922

In the 1930s when world population was about 2 billion, Adolf Hitler believed the world was overpopulated and, following an older philosophy of German expansion, sought to gain “Lebensraum” (living room) by invading other countries and exterminating “inferior” people, including Jews and Gypsies. By doing so he sought to create a super race of Arian Germans.  He was wrong.

 “In the limitation of this living space lies the compulsion for the struggle for survival, and the struggle for survival, in turn contains the precondition for evolution.”           

— Adolf Hitler in Mein Kampf, 1925

 When The Population Bomb was published in 1968 by Paul Ehrlich, world population was about 3.7 billion. He believed the world was overpopulated and required drastic action to reduce the population in order to prevent mass starvation and collapse of the society. He was wrong.

 “The battle to feed all of humanity is over. In the 1970s hundreds of millions of people will starve to death in spite of any crash programs embarked upon now. At this late date nothing can prevent a substantial increase in the world death rate…”

                                                            — Paul Ehrlich, The Population Bomb, 1968

 In that same decade, US Indian Health Service, using newly created Medicaid money, began sterilizing or implanting IUDs in Native American women without informed consent or knowledge and it was often coerced. For some tribes, it was near genocide. Department of Health Education and Welfare Population Crisis Committee sterilized up to a third of women in Puerto Rico.

Planned Parenthood clinics, which had been placed in poor, mostly black, neighborhoods began the modern abortion industry targeting African Americans as “human weeds;” the US Office of Economic Opportunity also set up “birth control” clinics in black neighborhoods and schools.

In 1966, under President Johnson, US AID began requiring population control quotas as a condition for receiving foreign aid, even in famines or other emergencies. Mass sterilization camps were set up in poor countries using equipment supplied by the UN and US.  This has continued to this day except for a recent Trump ban on USAID and US support for UNFPA being used for sterilization and abortion.  However, other agencies have filled the gap.

Meanwhile, in the 1960s Norman Borlaug and others began the Green Revolution by breeding more prolific, more disease resistant and more nutritious varieties of grains along with modern agricultural methods. Crop yields increased by orders of magnitude, making it possible to feed the world without sacrificing forests and other pristine wilderness areas.  India went from famine to self-sustainability in little more than a decade.  

In 1972, after nearly 30 years of controlling disease carrying insects, DDT was banned by the EPA in spite of overwhelming evidence refuting claims of harm; the ban was based more on political fears of a growing population in developing countries than on real science or perceived harm. It had been largely responsible for eradicating malaria in North America and Europe, and reducing its incidence in developing countries in which it was used.  US and UN agencies then required developing countries to abandon DDT in order to receive financial support.  It is even now only beginning to be used on interior walls in some areas of Africa to control malaria carrying mosquitos.  India never banned its use for homes and has greatly reduced malaria by semiannual spraying of interior walls.    Today India manufactures and exports DDT.  See “DDT: A Study in Scientific Fraud,” by J. Gordon Edwards, Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons Volume 9 Number 3 Fall 2004. On the web at: http://www.jpands.org/vol9no3/edwards.pdf, and related blog  DDT Needed Now in Underdeveloped Countries,

“My own doubts came when DDT was introduced for civilian use. In Guyana, within two years it had almost eliminated malaria, but at the same time the birth rate had doubled. So my chief quarrel with DDT in hindsight is that it has greatly added to the population problem.”

—Alexander King, cofounder of the Club of Rome, 1990

Today the world population is about 7.5 billion. USAID, UNFPA, (Fund for Population Activities), UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization), International Planned Parenthood, Population Council and other groups continue the abortion, sterilization, IUD implantation and birth control activities in poor countries around the world.  China has had a draconian one child policy involving forced abortions, sterilization and denial of benefits.  Recently China has allowed a second child, but only after 4 years and only with a state approval certificate.  A child born outside this requirement gets no government benefits or education.

So, is the world overpopulated? Let’s look at what we mean by overpopulated.

Do we have enough food for everyone? Yes. Thanks to modern agricultural techniques and high yield crops there is more than enough for at least 11 billion people without any increase in acres cultivated.  Advancing technology will probably multiply the yield still further as it has in the past. Is the food distributed fairly? No. Hunger has more to do with local politics than with food supplies.  Corrupt governments, propped up by government to government foreign aid, are incentivized to help with international population control schemes, but not to build infrastructure, attract investment and help to raise the standard of living of their own rural poor. 

Is there enough room for all the people? Compared to the land area of the earth, the population is very small. For perspective, if the entire global population was placed on the big island of Hawaii, everyone would have 1.4 square meters to sit or stand. Using the same thought experiment, if all the people in the world were placed in Texas, each person would have almost 93 square meters.  A family of four would have 372 square meters. That’s about 4000 square feet, enough for a 2000 square foot house and a yard or garden.  No one is suggesting we actually do this, except for the loony left who are grasping at straws to defeat this argument against the overpopulation myth. 

Global average population is 55 people per kilometer of land area, excluding Antarctica. That’s 17.96 acres per family of four. In 2016, over 54% of the population lived in cities, which covers only 2.7% of the land.  That means that 46% of the population is rural and lives on 97.3% of the land area. That calculates to 26 people /km2 in rural areas or 38 acres per family of four.  Yes, I know that large areas are uninhabitable. Even if we assumed 50% uninhabitable, that’s still a lot of land per person.  The fact that only 10% of the land is actually inhabited doesn’t change the picture.  There is still a lot of land out there to accommodate and feed a larger population. All this doesn’t even count the 71% of the earth’s surface that is water, which is a food source and a highway between markets.

Is the environment being harmed by too many people? No. Poverty, including subsistence farming, not population, causes environmental harm and deforestation.  Modern agriculture and higher yield crop varieties can end deforestation and provide surplus crops to sell.  Roads, electricity, clean water and disease control can provide a healthy workforce and energy to attract investors and run industry. 

Developed countries have bought into the overpopulation myth to the point that their birth rates are below replacement value. Japan, which reached one of the lowest global birth rates of 1.4 in 2014, has started paying people to have children because of the looming demographic catastrophe. Some of the highest density areas of the world are the richest.  Look at Shanghai. It is not only the most populated city in the world, 24 million, but is one of the most prosperous. 

Rural poor areas in developing countries are underpopulated. With diseases from insects and contaminated water taking a high toll and attrition from migration into cities by the young and healthy, there are not enough healthy people to build infrastructure and markets and raise the standard of living of the rural poor.  They already have population control.  They certainly don’t need birth control, sterilization and abortion. 

Is the planet overpopulated?  By all measures of overpopulation, the earth is far from capacity to support its people.  Since overpopulation advocates have been scaring us for 200 years, why should be believe what they keep saying?  Quit worrying about an assumed problem that has yet to materialize.  The real problem is with the population control advocates, the abortionists, the sterilizers and the international governmental and nongovernmental organizations that keep paying these organizations for killing off the hope of the future while keeping people in extreme poverty: poor,  sick, isolated, ignorant and controlled. Free market solutions are the answer, not money given to prop up corrupt government officials that the poor never see.

The rural poor in developing countries need disease control, electricity and roads to end isolation. They need Employment, Education, Investment, Infrastructure and Disease Control to join the 21st century. 

Note: Updated from an earlier post, June 2018.

*******************************************************************************

If you like this post share it with your friends, and sign up to follow this blog by email. Thank you.

The book: Saving Africa from Lies that Kill: How Myths about the Environment and Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries was published in November, 2018. Print and eBook are available online and in bookstores.

My first book, Perverted Truth Exposed: How Progressive Philosophy has Corrupted Science was published in 2016. It is available in print and ebook, on line only, through World Net Daily store, Amazon, Books-A-Million and Barnes & Noble.  See the companion blog at www.realscienceblog.com  for related posts.  Direct to Amazon listing HERE.

Saving Africa from Lies that Kill – New Book to Help Solve Old Problems

Saving Africa from Lies that Kill: How Myths about the Environment and Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries is a new book exposing the abuses of the poor in developing countries by international organizations that keep them from developing beyond their primitive state.  These agencies include UN agencies such as UNESCO, UNFPA, WHO and IPCC; the World Bank, USAID, International Planned Parenthood, Population Council, WWF, (Worldwide Fund for Nature, formerly World Wildlife Foundation), The Club of Rome, European Union Food Safety Authority, and Green Peace.. 

Based on environmental, climate change and overpopulation myths these organizations advocate population control quotas in exchange for foreign aid, and block the improvements that could reduce infant and child mortality, reduce and treat endemic diseases, provide electricity, clean water and sanitation, roads, railroads and airports, encourage investment and generally raise their economy and standard of living. 

These myths and the actions based on them are actually long standing colonialist/ communist/ socialist agendas to control the people and stop progress. Communist propaganda falsely paints these improvements as exploitive and harmful rather than building the economy.  Often, corrupt local governments are complicit and profit from the programs, reaping most of the foreign aid dollars. Although Africa has been used as the “poster child” in my book, the same principles apply to impoverished areas in other developing countries. Here are some important facts from the book.

  •  Poverty, not overpopulation is the cause of environmental damage.  Raising the standard of living and preventing high infant mortality will allow for better stewardship of the environment and stabilize the population.
  • Modern agricultural practices would eliminate deforestation from slash and burn subsistence agriculture, which depletes the soil. 
  •  High yield crops, first introduced in the Green Revolution of the 1960s, and genetically enhanced crops (GMO) that are higher in nutrition and more disease and drought resistant have made it possible to feed everyone. The European Union has banned imports from countries that grow GMO crops so many developing countries are forced to pass up this opportunity.  Starvation and malnutrition are often linked to corrupt governments and denial of these improvements to the rural poor.
  • Medical clinics are overstocked with sterilization, abortion and contraceptive products, but often lack emergency equipment and basic medicines for malaria, intestinal worms, and other endemic diseases.
  • Energy poverty is a major problem.  Environmentalists have prevented over 200 hydroelectric dams in Africa alone.  Africa has more than enough hydroelectric capacity for the foreseeable future, but few dams have been developed. India has solved most of its energy poverty with hydroelectric power. 
  • With electricity from hydroelectric dams or fossil fuel plants, other rural development is possible including roads and railroads, irrigation of fields, purified water, sanitary waste treatment, natural gas and electricity for homes, small businesses, agriculture, hospitals and industry. 
  • Water behind dams could provide plenty or water for homes, agriculture and industry, which is contrary to the environmentalists’ water shortage myth. 
  • Climate change agreements only support solar and wind power, which are unreliable and intermittent so they can’t be used as primary power for hospitals or industry. These poor countries can’t afford to settle for such luxuries. They need reliable power now.
  • Education is the most important element for clean water, sanitation and disease prevention.  Even without electrically powered water and sewage systems, with a knowledge of  invisible microbes, people can be taught how to dig wells, filter and purify water, make and use soap, and build toilets to end open defecation and use of raw feces on fields and in streams.
  • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re anemic and weakened from malaria, parasites and diarrhea. 80% of diseases are from insects. DDT and cheap medicines could end most of this and provide a healthy work force for development. 
  • Extensive research shows that DDT is harmless to humans and the environment, but it has been demonized to prevent its use in supposedly overpopulated, underdeveloped countries by population control advocates.  See references below.

 Solutions to these problems, which are self-evident from the list above, include exposing the organizational abuses and garnering assistance from both charitable organizations and investment by private industry to build infrastructure and to educate people in hygiene, modern agriculture, mining, technology, building and mechanical trades and small business administration. Foreign aid is only a Band-Aid that can only alleviate immediate emergency needs.  Investment, along with Employment, Education, Infrastructure and Disease Control, will end this unnecessary misery.

The last chapter highlights the many ways you can help.

References:

Related post:  DDT Needed Now in Underdeveloped Countries

Edwards, J. Gordon. “DDT: A Case Study in Scientific Fraud.” Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons Volume 9 Number 3 Fall 2004.  at http://www.jpands.org/vol9no3/edwards.pdf

 ********************************************

Available online and in book stores everywhere. In print and eBook through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million.  Note: some bookstores may not have it yet, but asking for them to order it for you may help to get it on the shelves faster.

After reading the book, please remember to review it online at any of the online stores above; share it with a friend and do your part to end bad practices. Like my Facebook page. Visit my blog for more information and to sign up for email updates at https://savingafricafromliesthatkill.com/

 

 

FREE: Amazon Kindle giveaway of my new book – Black Friday – Monday

This free Amazon Kindle giveaway offer won’t last long, so hurry to order your free Kindle eBook today!  click here to download your copy. Share this with friends and family.

Saving Africa from Lies that Kill: How Myths about the Environment and Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries shows how you can help end the unnecessary misery in Africa and other developing countries. No, not just by throwing money at the problem; rather, you can help advocate to end the stagnation caused by outdated wrong attitudes and practices. Africa needs Education, Employment, Investment, Infrastructure and Disease Control to bring them into the 21st century. Africa can grow new burgeoning markets, a source of new goods, new business opportunities and a new workforce for existing businesses, which can break the hold of Chinese goods and services. Investment, rather than foreign aid to corrupt governments is the key, as well as ending counterproductive practices by international organizations.

From the back cover:   How Myths about the Environment and overpopulation are destroying third world countries

In Saving Africa From Lies That Kill, Kay Kiser exposes the long-standing crimes committed against developing nations by the United Nations, World Bank, USAID and Planned Parenthood. Under their guise of “aid,” these organizations mire the underprivileged in isolation, poverty, sickness, and ignorance. In her book, Kiser argues:

  • Poverty, not overpopulation, causes environmental damage. Higher standards of living and lower infant mortality can improve the environment and stabilize the population.
  • Developing nations need access to reliable electricity in order to end energy poverty. This will, in turn, provide clean water, develop transportation, and power hospitals, homes and industrial investment.
  • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re weakened from malaria, parasites and dysentery. They need insect and disease control for a healthy workforce.
  • The Green Revolution and modern agriculture can feed everyone and end deforestation.

Fortunately, you can do something about the problem–and Kiser shows you how.

****************************************

Also available online and in book stores everywhere. In print and eBook through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million. 

After reading the book, please remember to review it online; share it with a friend and do your part to end bad practices. On Facebook, like my page HERE to receive updates, and visit my blog for more information and to sign up for email updates at https://savingafricafromliesthatkill.com/

World Vision -11x Hunger Challenge – Goal is to end extreme poverty

The best Christmas present you can give is to help a child in need. World Vision has people “on the ground” in crisis areas and does a marvelous job of helping.  Their ultimate goal is to eliminate extreme poverty and hunger by helping people become self sufficient.  Right now your donation to provide food and other necessities in the East Africa hunger crisis will be multiplied 11 times.  What better way to celebrate Christmas! See below for the contents of an email I just received with a link to a donation page for World Vision.


I hope this message finds you well as you are preparing for the Holidays! How can I be praying for you in this season?

On behalf of the families we serve, thank you for your partnership and support.  You have blessed lives in so many ways! 

As I have shared some recent mailings and emails, World Vision is continuing to keep up with the hunger crisis in East Africa.  Flooding, hunger, and conflict have upended people’s lives. But our staff are right there, working with families and communities to get them what they need, and strengthen the communities in the process.  We have an 11x multiplier right now for this work. 

The need is serious, especially for children. When crisis hit, children are often the most vulnerable. That’s why I’m reaching out. By giving to the East Africa fund you’ll can help support children with emergency food, provide families with animals, or get farmers the training they need to be better prepared. If you have already given to this recently, THANK YOU so very much for your timely gift!

If it’s on your heart to help these families and you’d like to make a gift, please Click here to help.

Many thanks. I look forward to hearing from you and I hope you have a wonderful holiday season!


To see more giving options and to order the Christmas catalog (free) click on this World Vision link.    To see more gifts that multiply, click on “Gifts that Multiply” 

Thank you for your generous gift to help stabilize East Africa in this latest crisis and start them on a road to economic self sufficiency and ultimately to prosperity.

 

Thank Goodness for the Industrial Revolution — Big Picture News, Informed Analysis

Long the whipping boy of environmentalists, the Industrial Revolution lifted humanity out of misery and squalor.

See chart below and continue reading via Thank Goodness for the Industrial Revolution — Big Picture News, Informed Analysis

It’s here! Saving Africa from Lies that Kill – new book just released

Now you can help end the unnecessary misery in Africa and other developing countries. No, not just by throwing money at the problem; rather, you can help advocate to end the stagnation caused by outdated wrong attitudes and practices. Africa needs Education, Employment, Investment, Infrastructure and Disease Control to bring them into the 21st century. Africa can grow new burgeoning markets, a source of new goods, new business opportunities and a new workforce for existing businesses, which can break the hold of Chinese goods and services. Investment, rather than foreign aid to corrupt governments is the key, as well as ending counterproductive practices by international organizations.

From the back cover:   How Myths about the Environment and overpopulation are destroying third world countries

In Saving Africa From Lies That Kill, Kay Kiser exposes the long-standing crimes committed against developing nations by the United Nations, World Bank, USAID and Planned Parenthood. Under their guise of “aid,” these organizations mire the underprivileged in isolation, poverty, sickness, and ignorance. In her book, Kiser argues:

  • Poverty, not overpopulation, causes environmental damage. Higher standards of living and lower infant mortality can improve the environment and stabilize the population.
  • Developing nations need access to reliable electricity in order to end energy poverty. This will, in turn, provide clean water, develop transportation, and power hospitals, homes and industrial investment.
  • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re weakened from malaria, parasites and dysentery. They need insect and disease control for a healthy workforce.
  • The Green Revolution and modern agriculture can feed everyone and end deforestation.

Fortunately, you can do something about the problem–and Kiser shows you how.

Available online and in book stores everywhere. In print and eBook through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million. 

After reading the book, please remember to review it online; share it with a friend and do your part to end bad practices. Visit my blog for more information and sign up for email updates at https://savingafricafromliesthatkill.com/

Developing Countries need Clean Water and Sanitation Now – 2

Clean Water for Developing Countries – Part 2.

In part 1 we discussed how to provide clean water, how to filter and purify water and the need to educate the people about microscopic sources of disease. Continuing this theme of improving health through simple life style changes, it is important to eliminate open defecation, use of raw sewage on crops and cross contamination of drinking water with biological contaminants.  Wells that are covered against contamination and accessed by hand pump are important, but so is sanitation and hygiene.

Families should be taught to

  • filter and boil drinking water, especially for their infants and young children;
  • use soap and water to bathe children regularly and wash their clothes;
  • insist on regular hand washing with soap and water;
  • emphasize no more open defecation in fields or streams;
  • build and maintain proper toilets
  • dispose of human and animal wastes away from streams, preferably by burning or burying garbage and trash;
  • make soap using wood ashes and animal fat in the time-honored saponification process (see below).
Soap and Water Washing
  • Soap and water handwashing, bathing and laundry are important to prevent disease. Soap not only removes visible dirt, but it is an excellent disinfectant. Soap and water washing of vegetables can disinfect them before consumption, making the food supply safer even in areas where raw feces are used on crops.
  • Soap can be bought if funds are available, or can be easily made by villagers from readily available materials. (see example below)
  • Excess handmade soap can be sold or traded for other goods or saved for later use.

Extracting Lye for Soap Making from Wood Ashes[1]
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Make Soap from Ashes and Fat
  1. Collect fine wood ashes in a wood or plastic container with small holes at the bottom and gravel and straw to retain the ashes. Mount on supports leaving room for a collection container. (Hard wood ashes work best. Avoid evergreen tree wood.)
    • CAUTION: collected lye solution can burn skin and eyes. Avoid direct contact and wash off any contacted solution with plenty of water.
  2. Collect lye from the ashes using a water slow leaching method (rain water works best).
  3. Collect fats or oils from cooking (any will do).
  4. Heat the lye solution and separately heat the fats/oil in half-filled pots.
  5. Add the hot oils to the liquid lye solution while stirring to mix.
  6. Since the lye concentration will be uncertain, exact measurements are not possible. Start with a one-to-one ratio of fats to lye solution and add more fats as needed until all of the lye is reacted.
  7. Stir constantly for at least 30 minutes or until the mixture starts to solidify.
  8. Pour into greased molds and let set until the next day.
  9. Cut into conveniently sized bars.

This can be a community project with contributors receiving a share of the product. It can also be the basis of a small business.

Cleaner Streams
  • Prevent human and animal waste from entering streams.
  • End the practice of open defecation.
  • Isolate animal pens away from streams by proper placement, preferably below the level of the stream or by low mud, brick or stone retaining walls around lots or at the stream.
  • Designate a garbage dump away from the stream, which can be regularly burned.
  • Collect animal wastes in a designated area so that they will be composted over time before use. “Green” manure can burn plants. Aging keeps this from happening. It also digests disease causing bacteria, viruses, worm eggs, etc. to make them safe.
Shoes to Protect from Parasites

Shoes for all, especially children, are needed to prevent parasitic worms from entering through their feet. With proper toilets and isolation of feces from streams or other water sources, the spread of parasitic worms can be reduced. However, tiny worm eggs drop to the ground from an infected person and can be picked up by bare feet. When wastes are applied to farm fields, bare feet can also pick them up there. In addition to ending application of raw sewage on fields, it is important to treat worm infections medically to end the cycle.

Sanitation and Hygiene

Toilets

Flush toilets with septic tanks are ideal. They can be either shared or installed in each home if pumped in water is available. If electricity is not available for pumping and purification, other immediate solutions must be put in place to end open defecation. Preferably, individual toilets for single families would further limit the spread of disease. Without pumped in water, flush toilets with septic tanks can be built and used by pouring water from streams for flushing. Water used in washing and cooking can be re-used for this purpose.

Pit toilets can be built for sharing with other villagers in order to end open defecation. Toilets need to have a means to exclude flies, which carry diseases, such as a seat cover, and a screened stack pipe above the roof to carry away odor and flammable gases. Pit toilets need to be built above grade so that surface runoff can’t enter. They need to be regularly treated with insecticide, lime, or ashes to reduce fly infestation. Several types include a simple pit, twin pit with movable structure, offset pit (septic) with pour flush basin, pit with baffle and access door that allows older accumulated waste to be removed and used on fields. Waste is safe to use on fields after one year.

Twin and Single pit toilets with ventilation[2]

Toilets can be built for squat or with an enclosed sitting platform. Both need seat covers to keep flies from entering and laying eggs. The twin pit toilet allows the filled pit to compost, dehydrate and digest pathogens while the second pit is filling. When the second pit is nearly filled, the first pit can be emptied and safely used as compost on gardens if the contents have aged at least one year. The first pit can then be re-used while the second one is composting. A single pit toilet will need a second pit to be dug when it is nearly filled and the contents needs to be buried with soil from the new pit or sealed for composting. Note that in areas where soil may collapse into the pit, walls of mud bricks can be built to retain the soil.

Pour flush toilet with water trap barrier to odors.[3]
This design can also be used with twin pits for easier composting. Water for flushing can be from any source including used wash water, aka greywater.

 

[1] Mother Earth News, “How to Make Hot-Process Soft Soap,” Dec 2016/Jan 2017.

[2] Practical Action, Improved Toilets at https://practicalaction.org/improved-toilets

[3] WHO Publication, Emergency Sanitation: Assessment and Programme Design

New book to be released November; preorder now; get Kindle eBook today.

SAVING AFRICA FROM LIES THAT KILL:

HOW MYTHS ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT AND OVERPOPULATION ARE DESTROYING THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES

New book to be released November 13, 2018; preorder on Amazon now; get Kindle eBook TODAY.  My new book reveals the abuses of developing countries by international organizations, based on the overpopulation myth and false assumptions about genetic inferiority and environmental damage.  Learn how you can help to end these practices and bring these cultures into the twenty-first century. Investment, Infrastructure, Education and Employment are the answers to building these economies, improving the lives of their peoples, stabilizing the population and protecting the environment.

New book to be released November 13, 2018

Back cover:  In Saving Africa From Lies That Kill, Kay Kiser exposes the long-standing crimes committed against developing nations by the United Nations, World Bank, USAID and Planned Parenthood. Under their guise of “aid,” these organizations mire the underprivileged in isolation, poverty, sickness and ignorance.

In her book, Kiser argues:

    • Poverty, not overpopulation, causes environmental damage.  Higher standards of living and lower infant mortality can improve the environment and stabilize the population.

    • Developing nations need access to reliable electricity in order to end energy poverty. This will, in turn, provide clean water, develop transportation, and power hospitals, homes and industrial investment.

    • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re weakened from malaria, parasites and dysentery. They need insect and disease control for a healthy workforce.

    • The Green Revolution and modern agriculture can feed everyone and end deforestation. 

available in bookstores and online, in paperback or e-book November 13, 2018. Preorder on Amazon now. GET Kindle E-book today.

Developing Countries Need Clean Water Now

Clean Water for Developing Countries – Part 1.

Clean Water, Hygiene Education and Sanitation Will Reduce High Infant Mortality in Poor Countries

Water-borne disease is the leading killer of children under five years of age in Africa and other developing countries. The World Health Organization estimates that 85 percent of diseases among infants and children under the age of five are water borne. Water-borne illness is the leading cause of death worldwide. WHO estimates that worldwide 3.4 million people die each year from preventable water-borne illnesses. That’s 9,300 per day! Most of them are infants, young children, pregnant women, the ill, infirm and elderly. Surface waters are usually contaminated with bacteria and parasites because it is a multipurpose source, including waste disposal. The result is high infant and childhood mortality from intestinal parasites and diarrhea.

Under 5 Mortality per Thousand, WHO 2008, African Nations vs Developed Nations

Comparison of under five mortality per 1,000 births in Africa (average 111/1000 or 11 percent; max 220/1000 for Angola) to that of developed countries on the same vertical scale. (Average 5/1000 or 0.5 percent; Max 11/1000 or 1.1 percent for Russian Federation) UNWHO 2010 Health Statistics

Many poor people in Africa and other developing countries lack a source of clean or purified water. Rivers and streams are used for drinking water, waste disposal, washing, and cooking. Sometimes water from streams must be carried for long distances, which is a time consuming and back breaking process. Dependence on contaminated surface water and a lack of proper toilets and waste disposal all result in cross contamination of their only drinking water source with human and animal feces, animal bodies, and other contaminating wastes. Many people without proper toilets defecate in the open, which spreads disease directly or through flies and other insects. The United Nations estimates 2.6 billion people globally have no access to clean water and toilets.

Raw human sewage and animal wastes as well as contaminated surface waters are applied to garden crops. Runoff from these fields in rainy seasons can further contaminate the streams. Applying human wastes to fields contaminates the soil so that diseases can be spread by the soil, insects, and the vegetables grown there. Without washing with soap and cooking vegetables, there is no barrier to ingestion of diseases and parasites. Even local health care facilities often lack purified water, proper toilets, and soap and water handwashing facilities. This is totally unacceptable in a world with both the knowledge and ability to clean up this mess.

So what can be done about this situation? Ideally, with electricity, water and waste treatment facilities can be built, and purified water can be piped into homes or at least into villages. Flush toilets are possible with piped in water, which is only possible with electric pumps. Septic systems could be used in lieu of waste treatment plants. However, because such systems will be implemented gradually to reach remote areas over a period of years, other means of stopping the cycle of disease must be started at once. There are some simple ways to end this tragic cycle of high infant and child mortality now. Most or all of these methods can be implemented by poor people themselves if they are first shown how to do it.

Hygiene Education

The most important aspect of this campaign is education. As teachers educate people about ending the cycle of needless water-borne diseases, they can train other trainers to spread the good news. The chain can be expanded through an “each one, teach one” approach. Posters and handouts can enhance the message that saving the lives of innocents only requires a few simple changes in daily life.

Without knowledge and an appreciation of microscopic bacteria, parasites, and worm eggs, people have no incentive to clean up old bad habits such as defecating in streams and fields and drinking unprocessed contaminated surface water. Without knowledge of these unseen microscopic monsters, there is no way to break the cycle of disease transmission. Once people are taught that there are microscopic sources of diseases, invisible to the naked eye, then remediation can be taught and adopted. It is also important that they understand that feces contamination is a major source of disease and that human and animal feces must be isolated from streams and other sources of drinking water. Families also need to understand that clear water is not clean water. Filtration through washable and reusable cloth bag filters helps to clear water but does little to remove pathogens. Slow filtration through sand will remove most pathogens and then boiling can insure purity for babies and young children.

Wells

Hand dug or drilled community wells, protected from contamination, are needed to provide a source of clean water. Ground water is usually much cleaner than surface water because it is filtered through soil and is less likely to have contaminants thrown into it. Wells need to be installed away from or above sources of animal wastes and toilets to avoid possible groundwater contamination. They need to have at least a raised wall and cover to keep surface run-off from entering

Hand pumped wells don’t need electricity. These can either have commercial manual pumps or primitive devices such as a simple bucket on a rope raised by a wench, or a shadoof, which is a bucket on a rope attached to a long counterweighted pole, or a sakieh, which consists of a series of pots attached to a continuous rope system to bring water to the surface. Sealed, covered wells with hand pumps are preferable because it is less likely that contamination can fall into the well or be transferred by exposed ropes.

Village Hand Pumped Clean Water Well; Source: UN Archive

In some areas where hand-dug shallow wells are unreliable, deep wells, drilled by machine can supply more people and provide more reliable clean water. Because this process is expensive and requires specialized machinery, charitable organizations or WHO loans can help to bring this about.

 

Low Sand Dams

In arid areas where streams dry up between rainy seasons, a low, sand dam can be built to retain rainwater runoff when the rains come. A low, stone or brick wall is constructed on bedrock across a narrow area of the dry river to catch and hold the water. The catchment behind the dam will fill with sand over time, but the sand will hold 25 to 45 percent water. This water can be accessed by digging holes and scooping out the water. In this case, the water will still be cloudy because it holds smaller suspended particles unless it is allowed to settle for a time.

How a Low Sand Dam Works; Source: Kenya Ministry of Water and Irrigation, “Practice Manual For Small Dams, Pans and Other Water Conservation Structures in Kenya” at www.smalldamsguidelines.water.go.ke.

The other way to access the water is to lay a slotted pipe in the bottom leading to a hand pump on the river bank or extended through the dam. In this case, the water is both cleaner and clearer. These sand dams provide water for agriculture as well as for home use. Because the water is stored in sand, there is less evaporation than from open ponds. An additional benefit is that horizontal seepage over time replenishes the underground water table.

African Countries with Low Sand Dams or with that Potential; Source: Wikipedia, Iangrahamneal 18 December 2009, Creative Commons

Other Sources of Water

  • Hydroelectric dams in areas where water is more abundant can be used to provide water for industry, agriculture and home use. (See chapter 12.)
  • Clean springs can be used with a pipe or covered trough to carry water from its source in pristine forested mountains to villages and homes. Treatment by slow sand filter can add confidence in purity.
Rain Water
  • Rain water can be collected from metal or tile roofs by gutters directed into rain barrels.
  • Rain barrels must be securely sealed or screened except for the gutter inlet to prevent mosquitos from laying eggs.
  • Cisterns are similar to rain barrel collection; they are composed of roof-like collection facilities that drain into a large protected collection tank.
  • Because rain water may pick up contamination from the roof, it is best to use a slow sand filter to purify it further.
  • First flush tipping gutter section may also eliminate leaves and debris before it can go into the collection container.
Dew or Fog

Dew is water that condenses on surfaces when the temperature falls to the dew point and atmospheric water vapor condenses on cool surfaces. Even in tropical or desert environments, dew often falls at night. Clear skies favor more dew; wind tends to reduce the amount of dew collected, so still air is best.

Fog is suspended water droplets that can cling to surfaces, much like dew. Dew and fog can be collected if nighttime temperatures reach the dew point. Arrays of cloth, screen, metal or plastic can be suspended off the ground so that condensation drains into a central container or trough for collection. Metal roofs with gutters can be used for both rain water and dew collection.

  • Individual dew collectors, such as metal strips suspended off the ground, can be set up at intervals in fields to help water crops
  • Large arrays of cloth or screen can capture fog in area where fog frequently occurs such as coastal regions. Fog fences have been installed successfully in places like Ethiopia, Chile and Morocco to collect water.
Cleaner Drinking Water

Slow sand filters are one of the easiest ways to clean water of pathogens and colloidal particles. Building a slow sand filter requires little beyond local materials. A good manual I found that explains the finer points of operation and construction is “Biosand Filter Construction Manual” from CAWST, Center for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology, that can be downloaded as a pdf file here. or enter the address below in your URL field.

https://sswm.info/sites/default/files/reference_attachments/CAWST%202009%20Biosand%20Filter%20Manual.pdf

 

Sand Filter for Home Drinking Water (may include a layer of charcoal); Source: MIT “How to Build Almost Anything,” student Emily Gorbaty at http://fab.cba.mit.edu/classes/863.12/people/egorbaty/a1.html

  

 

 

 

The Slow Sand Filter Principles; Source: “The Slow Sand Filter” undergraduate research presentation, Prof. Massoud Pirbazari, faculty supervisor, Univ. of Southern California

 

 

  Water Purification

Filter and boil drinking water from surface sources to kill bacteria and parasites.

  • Surface water from streams may be muddy so settling and/or filtration may be necessary.
  • A slow sand filter will clear the water and remove many pathogens, but further purification is recommended.
  • Boiling water is the surest and quickest way to kill bacteria or parasites. Since this uses precious fuel, it may not be possible for some poor people. Other means of purification are recommended if boiling is not feasible.
  • UV from sunlight will kill most bacteria and parasites in six to ten hours in clear plastic one to two liter soda or water bottles if the water is clear. Prefiltering is recommended. Laying bottles on a reflective surface will enhance purification. Larger bottles are not recommended because UV from sunlight is reduced by traveling through a greater depth of water. The larger the bottle, the longer it takes to purify.

    Purifying water with UV rays from sunlight; Source: UNICEF
  • A solar still uses condensation inside a container. Water evaporates and condenses on the top and sides of the container and is collected in a separate container. This can also be used for desalination of brackish water or as the ultimate purification method. See illustrations below.
A simple solar still; Appropedia “Improving Basin Solar Stills” is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Share-alikeW License (CC-BY-SA)

Infant and childhood mortality can be greatly reduced and village life can be much improved when the people are armed with the knowledge of microscopic bacteria, parasites and worm eggs, and the knowledge of how to purify water and clean surfaces by washing with soap. Control of insects and recognition of their important role in spreading diseases must be a part of education and training for healthier lives. An understanding of the role of flies in spreading disease is vital.

*************************************************************************

SAVING AFRICA FROM LIES THAT KILL:

HOW MYTHS ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT AND OVERPOPULATION ARE DESTROYING THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES

My new book reveals the abuses of developing countries by international organizations, based on the overpopulation myth and false assumptions about genetic inferiority and environmental damage.  Learn how you can help to end these practices and bring these cultures into the twenty-first century.

New book to be published in November, 2018

Back cover:  In Saving Africa From Lies That Kill, Kay Kiser exposes the long-standing crimes committed against developing nations by the United Nations, World Bank, USAID and Planned Parenthood. Under their guise of “aid,” these organizations mire the underprivileged in isolation, poverty, sickness and ignorance.

In her book, Kiser argues:

    • Poverty, not overpopulation, causes environmental damage.  Higher standards of living and lower infant mortality can improve the environment and stabilize the population.

    • Developing nations need access to reliable electricity in order to end energy poverty. This will, in turn, provide clean water, develop transportation, and power hospitals, homes and industrial investment.

    • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re weakened from malaria, parasites and dysentery. They need insect and disease control for a healthy workforce.

    • The Green Revolution and modern agriculture can feed everyone and end deforestation. 

available in bookstores and online, in paperback or e-book in November. Preorder on Amazon now. Get Kindle e-book today!