African countries deem EU carbon border levy ‘protectionist’ — Watts Up With That?

Some African countries consider the EU’s planned carbon border levy to be “protectionist”. That was the upshot of a conference organised by the French government on Tuesday (23 March), which examined the challenges posed by the EU’s upcoming mechanism. EURACTIV France reports.

African countries deem EU carbon border levy ‘protectionist’ — Watts Up With That?

Global Crop projections break records again

Record global crop projections destroy media lies and gloom 

 

Wheat [image credit: Phys.org]

Habitual climate miserablists should take a look around at the real world now and again. This year’s poor UK wheat harvest, reported by the BBC with a ‘climate change’ tag, looks like the exception not the rule.
– – –
The International Grains Council (IGC) is reporting that global corn, wheat, and rice production is on pace to set new records this year, destroying an incessant parade of media claims that global warming is devastating crop production.

Here at Climate Realism, we have documented and debunked many of the ridiculous media claims that climate change is decimating crop production, some in the last month.

Global crop production, as well as crop production in most of the world’s nations, sets new records virtually every year as our planet modestly warms.

Now, the IGC reports – unsurprisingly – that the same is happening in 2020.

The online agriculture news service, World-Grain.com published a story, “IGC projects record output for corn, wheat and soybeans,” highlighting the findings of the International Grains Council (IGC), that it expects the harvest of key cereal crops, corn, rice, soybeans, and wheat, which are the core staple crops for many peoples around the world, to set records in 2020.

Full article here.

Renewable Energy: Highly Inefficient and Environmentally Harmful

Renewable energy – not so clean, not so sustainable and not good for developing countries

Those profiting from the Climate Change and the renewable energy game don’t want you to see the Planet of the Humans movie, which reveals the ugly truths behind popular renewable energy schemes. It has been deleted from Youtube but was preserved at the site below. Watch and learn.

via Hide & Seek: Media Keep Burying Mike Moore’s Planet of the Humans & Bloggers Keeps Digging It Up — STOP THESE THINGS

NOTE: Although this is a good expose of renewable energy schemes, including solar, wind and biomass, there is even more to the story.  Cleaner and more sustainable alternatives are not mentioned, including nuclear, abundant clean natural gas, hydroelectric and geothermal energy.  Ecological harm, although mentioned as disrupting the environment, did not really include the huge tole on birds, bats and beneficial insects that are being chopped up or burned alive by wind turbines or mirror array solar energy farms.  The movie paints a depressing no-win picture of dwindling scarce resources, burgeoning population and unsolvable pollution problems. All of these assumptions are unfounded or exaggerated, now as they were 40 years ago.

Poverty, not high population, causes environmental harm. Raising the standard of living of poor countries through investment in energy,  transportation and healthcare infrastructure and jobs, as well as modern agricultural practices, can protect the environment, stabilize the population and reduce deforestation.

Additionally, to insist that poor countries forego fossil fuels, which have developed modern nations, and go straight to unreliable and intermittent wind or solar energy, is irresponsible or criminal.  See earlier posts at this site, and/or get my book: Saving Africa from Lies that Kill: How Myths about the Environment & Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries. To buy the book from Amazon, click hereRead the introduction and first chapter free through Bookfunnel by clicking here 

 

 

 

Reliable Electricity is Essential to Economic Development

No Roads and No Electricity: Why Fossil Fuels are Indispensable for Development

I live in the Silicon Valley of India, Bangalore. Except for the tech companies, there aren’t many similarities between Bangalore (now Bengaluru) and the Silicon Valley in California.

I live in the northern part of the city. Roads here remain in an unusable condition. They are worse than any bad road you would find in the U.S. The road leading to my neighborhood—frequented by thousands of cars every day—has remained dug up for more than 400 days now. In fact, reports indicate that around 30,000 roads in the city of Bengaluru remain either dug up or in worse condition.

Electricity infrastructure experiences frequent failures and inability to cope with even a slight drizzle of rain. Power blackouts—like the one that occurred in New York in early July—are an everyday event in many parts of India.

That is an appalling situation even by Third World standards, given that the city is the hub of some of the richest tech companies in the world.

Despite rapid economic development in India, some of India’s biggest cities still lack basic infrastructure and sanitation facilities. One reason is how rapidly its economy has grown—outpacing the growth of its infrastructure.

With 1.3 billion people, India’s developing economy can only achieve infrastructure progress in its major cities by achieving rapid economic progress. The economic progress in turn is primarily dependent on its energy sector. Energy is the backbone of any developing economy.

Ever since the liberalization of its economy in the 1990s, India has progressed by leaps and bounds. The manufacturing and service industries are slowly drawing people away from agriculture.

Many forget that this propulsion of India’s economy in the past three decades, and of any growing economy for that matter, was made possible because fossil fuels have provided energy and improved agricultural outputs: the two key pillars of India’s economy.

Today, India produces more electricity than required, but the transmission infrastructure is far behind the standards of developed countries. Fossil fuel provides more than three-fourths of the country’s energy. Fossil fuel-based fertilizers and pesticides have helped the country produce enough food for domestic consumption and export.

Twenty years ago, everyone I knew was aware of the fact that coal is one of the major solutions to our energy problems. We were right.

Today, coal is not only the country’s largest contributor to electricity, it is also the cheapest and most abundant source, resulting in uninterrupted power supply in places that have good grid infrastructure.

Our infrastructure—including transport and other public utility systems—will improve only as our economy continues to use the coal reserves, the existing oil resources, and the newly discovered natural gas reserves.

India’s defiant embrace of fossil fuels, despite pressure from anti-fossil establishments, gives hope to residents like me who can dream about a future with drivable roads and uninterrupted power supply.

Featured image by John Fornander on Unsplash.

Saving Africa from Lies That Kill – New Book

My new book, Saving Africa From Lies That Kill: How Myths about the Environment and Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries is now available online and in book stores everywhere. In print and eBook through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million.  Note: some bookstores may not have it yet, but asking for them to order it for you will help to get it on the shelves faster.

From the back cover:  In Saving Africa From Lies That Kill, Kay Kiser exposes the long-standing crimes committed against developing nations by the United Nations, World Bank, USAID and Planned Parenthood. Under their guise of “aid,” these organizations mire the underprivileged in isolation, poverty, sickness, and ignorance.
In her book, Kiser argues:
•Poverty, not overpopulation, causes environmental damage. Higher standards of living and lower infant mortality can improve the environment and stabilize the population.
•Developing nations need access to reliable electricity in order to end energy poverty. This will, in turn, provide clean water, develop transportation, and power hospitals, homes and industrial investment.
•Africans aren’t lazy; they’re weakened from malaria, parasites and dysentery. They need insect and disease control for a healthy workforce.
•The Green Revolution and modern agriculture can feed everyone and end deforestation.
Fortunately, you can do something about the problem—and Kiser shows you how!

After reading the book, please remember to review it on Amazon; share it with a friend and do your part to end bad practices. Visit my blog for more information and to sign up for email updates at https://savingafricafromliesthatkill.com/   and like my Facebook page.

Ending Energy Poverty in poor countries

Seeking to End Suffering by Ending Energy Poverty

The South African energy provider Eskom’s coal power plant Lethabo in Sasolburg/ Getty Images

By Matthew Vadum March 19, 2019 Updated: March 20, 2019                        

A former Texas state lawmaker is spearheading a campaign against radical environmentalists and powerful international organizations, whose policies keep people in developing nations in desperate poverty and misery by discouraging the development of electricity-based networks worldwide. Jason Isaac is taking aim at those promoting the scourge of “energy poverty,” which keeps people in underdeveloped countries poor and sick, shaving decades off life expectancies on the African continent and elsewhere by making it difficult for consumers to access electric power for their daily needs. Isaac represented District 45 in the Texas House of Representatives from January 2011 to January 2019 as a Republican. While there, he was a member of the Energy Resources Committee. Isaac recently joined the Texas Public Policy Foundation, a non-profit, non-partisan research institute in Austin. At TPPF, he is senior manager and distinguished fellow of the “Life: Powered” initiative, whose mission “is to ensure that Americans understand the connections between energy, prosperity, and freedom.”

To see more, click here to visit The Epoch Times

Anti-humanism, Environmentalism and the Overpopulation Myth

New book to be released November; preorder now; get Kindle eBook today.

SAVING AFRICA FROM LIES THAT KILL:

HOW MYTHS ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT AND OVERPOPULATION ARE DESTROYING THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES

New book to be released November 13, 2018; preorder on Amazon now; get Kindle eBook TODAY.  My new book reveals the abuses of developing countries by international organizations, based on the overpopulation myth and false assumptions about genetic inferiority and environmental damage.  Learn how you can help to end these practices and bring these cultures into the twenty-first century. Investment, Infrastructure, Education and Employment are the answers to building these economies, improving the lives of their peoples, stabilizing the population and protecting the environment.

New book to be released November 13, 2018

Back cover:  In Saving Africa From Lies That Kill, Kay Kiser exposes the long-standing crimes committed against developing nations by the United Nations, World Bank, USAID and Planned Parenthood. Under their guise of “aid,” these organizations mire the underprivileged in isolation, poverty, sickness and ignorance.

In her book, Kiser argues:

    • Poverty, not overpopulation, causes environmental damage.  Higher standards of living and lower infant mortality can improve the environment and stabilize the population.

    • Developing nations need access to reliable electricity in order to end energy poverty. This will, in turn, provide clean water, develop transportation, and power hospitals, homes and industrial investment.

    • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re weakened from malaria, parasites and dysentery. They need insect and disease control for a healthy workforce.

    • The Green Revolution and modern agriculture can feed everyone and end deforestation. 

available in bookstores and online, in paperback or e-book November 13, 2018. Preorder on Amazon now. GET Kindle E-book today.

New book to be released November; preorder now; get Kindle today.

SAVING AFRICA FROM LIES THAT KILL:

HOW MYTHS ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT AND OVERPOPULATION ARE DESTROYING THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES

My new book reveals the abuses of developing countries by international organizations, based on the overpopulation myth and false assumptions about genetic inferiority and environmental damage.  Learn how you can help to end these practices and bring these cultures into the twenty-first century.

New book to be published in November, 2018

Back cover:  In Saving Africa From Lies That Kill, Kay Kiser exposes the long-standing crimes committed against developing nations by the United Nations, World Bank, USAID and Planned Parenthood. Under their guise of “aid,” these organizations mire the underprivileged in isolation, poverty, sickness and ignorance.

In her book, Kiser argues:

    • Poverty, not overpopulation, causes environmental damage.  Higher standards of living and lower infant mortality can improve the environment and stabilize the population.

    • Developing nations need access to reliable electricity in order to end energy poverty. This will, in turn, provide clean water, develop transportation, and power hospitals, homes and industrial investment.

    • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re weakened from malaria, parasites and dysentery. They need insect and disease control for a healthy workforce.

    • The Green Revolution and modern agriculture can feed everyone and end deforestation. 

available in bookstores and online, in paperback or e-book in November. Preorder on Amazon now.

Solving Africa’s Energy Poverty Problem, Part 5 Geothermal

Geothermal Power can help solve Africa’s energy poverty

The East African Rift Valley Geothermal Resources Source: Alan Hoffman at lapsedphysicist.org

Geothermal power generation is possible in broad seismically active regions of Africa such as the Rift Valley and near some volcanoes. There are 157 active volcanoes in Africa that may offer potential for geothermal energy generation (see map). Most of them are in East Africa along the Rift Valley, but some occur in North and West Africa. The Rift Valley has an estimated potential of 4,000 MW of energy, but less than 600 MW have been developed, largely in Kenya with 586 MW currently available. Ethiopia has a small 7.3 MW facility. Surface surveys and exploration are underway in several other countries. Much of the funding for these projects comes through the World Bank and Geothermal Risk Mitigation Facility (GRMF) fund, a multinational organization, which is administered by the African Union (AU).[1] GRMF has eleven-member countries: Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda, Burundi, Comoros Islands, Eritrea, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti and Zambia.

For comparison, the “Geological Survey of India has identified 350 geothermal energy locations in the country. The most promising of these is in Puga valley of Ladakh. The estimated potential for geothermal energy in India is about 10,000 MW.”[2] None have been developed to generate electricity at this time. Surveying, exploring and evaluating potentials continues.

Source: India Energy Portal at http://www.indiaenergyportal.org/

Geothermal Electric Power Details

Wells are drilled into thermally active areas and hot water or steam is pumped out, often under their own pressure, to turn turbines connected to electrical generators before being condensed and returned through injection wells to replenish the reservoir. Water heated above the boiling point turns to steam as the pressure is relieved while being pumped to the surface. There are several types of plants depending on the temperature of the geothermal energy available.

  • For vapor dominated systems at the highest temperatures, 464 to 572°F (240 to 300°C), steam is forced directly from wells under its own power to turn turbines/generators.
  • For liquid dominated systems at temperatures, greater than 360°F (182°C), superheated water under pressure pushes toward the surface and, as pressure is reduced in transit, part of it boils and produces steam for turning turbines/generators.
  • For binary systems at temperatures in the range of 248º to 392ºF, (120º–200ºC), hot water pushes is pumped out of the wells, which then heats a lower boiling secondary fluid to produce “steam,” a.k.a. gas, to turn turbines/generators.

In all of these cases the water is condensed and returned through an injection well although some of it may be recycled in binary systems for further heat extraction. The secondary fluid of binary systems, usually a lower boiling hydrocarbon, is completely condensed and recycled in a closed-loop system (see diagrams below).[4]

Figure 13: Schematic diagram of a typical steam or hot water to steam geothermal power plant [5]
 

Schematic diagram of a binary cycle geothermal power plant

By 2020 Kenya hopes to be the first sub-Saharan African nation to reach “universal access” to electricity with 95 percent of homes having access to electricity, an increase from 2016 when 55 percent of homes had access. Over 60 percent of Kenya’s electrical power is provided by hydroelectric and geothermal power plants. Kenya plans to increase geothermal power output ten-fold to 5,000 MW by 2030, which is 26 percent of its total geothermal capacity.

[1] Waruru, Maina, “More African Countries Embrace Geothermal Power, Receive $37M in Funding,” Renewable Energy World magazine, June 23, 2016, http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2016/06/more-african-countries-embrace-geothermal-power-receive-37m-in-funding.html.

[2] India Energy Portal at http://www.indiaenergyportal.org/

[3] India Energy Portal at http://www.indiaenergyportal.org/

[4] India Energy Portal at http://www.indiaenergyportal.org/subthemes_link.php?text=geothermal&themeid=1 Original source is World Energy Council, 2001 Survey of World Energy Resources at https://www.worldenergy.org/publications/2001/world-energy-resources-2001.

[5] World Energy Council, 2001 Survey of World Energy Resources at https://www.worldenergy.org/publications/2001/world-energy-resources-2001/ Original Source: Geothermal Energy, 1998, University of Utah).