AgroEcology blocks improvements for the poor

Eco-Imperialism Book by Paul Driessen

Uber-organic campaign enshrines primitive agriculture and malnutrition as human rights

Paul Driessen and David Wojick                   

Friday, ‎July ‎20, ‎2018, ‏‎11:11:47 PM

Not every poor person in impoverished places around the world aspires to the modern living standards they see and hear about: indoor plumbing, electricity for lights, a refrigerator and stove, a paucity of disease-carrying insects, top-notch schools and hospitals, their children living past age five. But many do.

Not every poor African, Asian or Latin American farmer wants to give up his backbreaking, dawn to dusk traditional agricultural practices, guiding his ox and plow, laying down meager supplies of manure to fertilize crops, surviving droughts, repeatedly hand spraying pesticides to battle ravenous insects – to reap harvests that often barely feed his family, much less leave produce to sell locally. But many do.

Unfortunately, they often face formidable foes. An absence of electricity, roads and other infrastructure. Corrupt, kleptocratic governments. Nonexistent property rights and other collateral to secure loans. Powerful, well-financed eco-imperialists whose policies perpetuate poverty, malnutrition and disease.

Banks and other carbon colonialists glorify limited wind and solar energy for poor villages, while denying financial support for fossil fuel electricity generation. Anti-chemical fanatics promote bed nets and narrowly defined “integrated pest management,” but bitterly oppose chemical pesticides and the spatial repellant DDT to kill mosquitoes, keep them out of homes and prevent deadly malaria.

Radical organic food groups battle any use of genetically engineered crops that multiply crop yields, survive droughts and slash pesticide spraying by 75% or more. They even vilify Golden Rice, which enables malnourished children to avoid Vitamin A Deficiency, blindness and death.

Now poor country families face even harder struggles, as a coalition of well-financed malcontents, agitators and pressure groups once again proves the adage that power politics makes strange bedfellows. Coalition members share a deep distaste for fossil fuels, chemical pesticides and fertilizers, corporations, capitalism, biotechnology, and virtually all aspects of modern agriculture.

Their growing social-political movement is called “AgroEcology.” While the concept is studiously vague, it essentially asserts that indigenous, traditional farmers must be shielded from market forces and modern technologies, so that they can continue using ancient, primitive, “culturally appropriate” methods.

AgroEcology is anti-GMO organic food activism on steroids. It rejects virtually everything that has enabled modern agriculture to feed billions more people from less and less acreage and, given the chance, could eliminate hunger and malnutrition worldwide. It is rabidly opposed to biotechnology, monoculture farming, non-organic fertilizers and chemical insecticides – and even despises mechanized equipment like tractors, and the hybrid seeds and other advances developed by Dr. Norman Borlaug’s Green Revolution.

AgroEcology advocates tortured but clever concepts like “food sovereignty” and the “right to subsistence farming by indigenous people.” It promotes “indigenous agricultural knowledge and practices,” thus excluding the vast storehouse of non-indigenous learning, practices and technologies that were developed in recent centuries – and are readily available to anyone with access to a library or internet connection.

Or as they put it: “Food sovereignty is the right of peoples to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems. It puts the aspirations and needs of those who produce, distribute and consume food at the heart of food systems and policies, rather than the demands of markets and corporations.” Food sovereignty also “focuses on production and harvesting methods that maximize the contribution of ecosystems, avoid costly and toxic inputs, and improve the resiliency of local food systems in the face of climate change.” (The 2007 Declaration of Nyéléni, the first global forum on food sovereignty. In Mali!)

Some adherents even seek the “re-peasantization” of Latin American society!

AgroEcology has the financial backing of far-left foundations like the Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, which collectively have committed more than $500 million to a raft of like-minded NGOs.

Its precepts and policies are approved and actively promoted by the Food and Agriculture Organization, World Bank and other UN agencies at their taxpayer-funded international conferences. These agencies are even beginning to demand adherence to über-organic practices as a condition for receiving taxpayer funding for agricultural development programs in Africa, Asia and Latin America. (But taxpayers and legislators who provide the funding have been permitted little substantive input on any of this.)

It’s all justified – and often accepted without question in government agencies and universities – by reference to the politically correct, virtue-signaling terminology of our era: sustainability, sustainable farming, dangerous manmade climate change, social justice, indigenous rights, self-determination.

Also typical, anyone opposing these ideologies, policies and demands is vilified as a “willful supporter” of violence against women, “land-grabbing” by multinational corporations, peasant farmer suicides, “mass expropriation and genocide” of indigenous people, and crimes against humanity.

Imagine how intolerant AgroEcology ideologues would react if a farmer wanted to assert his or her food sovereignty and self-determination – by planting hybrid corn, using modern synthetic fertilizers or (heaven forbid) planting Bt corn (maize), to get higher yields, spend less time in the field, spray fewer pesticides, or improve the family’s living standards by selling surplus crops. And yet many want to do exactly that.

“By planting the new Bt cotton on my six hectares [15 acres], I was able to build a house and give it a solar panel,” Bethuel Gumede told the late Roy Innis, then chairman of the Congress of Racial Equality, during a trip to South Africa. “I also bought a TV and fridge. My wife can buy healthy food, and we can afford to send the kids to school. My life has changed completely.”

“I grow maize on a half hectare,” Elizabeth Ajele told him. “The old plants would be destroyed by insects, but not the new biotech plants. With the profits I get from the new Bt maize, I can grow onions, spinach and tomatoes, and sell them for extra money to buy fertilizer. We were struggling to keep hunger out of our house. Now the future looks good.”

Equally relevant, how can agricultural practices that barely sustained families and villages before the advent of modern agriculture possibly feed the world? As Dr. Borlaug said in 2006: “Our planet has 6.5 billion people. If we use only organic fertilizers and methods on existing farmland, we can only feed 4 billion. I don’t see 2.5 billion people volunteering to disappear.”

AgroEcology promoters like Greenpeace, Food & Water Watch, Pesticide Action Network, Union of Concerned scientists and La Via Campesina (The Peasant Way) pay little attention to any of this. They’re too busy “saving people” from “dangerous” hybrid seeds, GMOs, agribusiness, farm machinery and chemicals. Not that any of them would ever want to toil on any of the primitive farms they extol.

Greenpeace frightens Africans by claiming “some researchers think DDT and DDE could be inhibiting lactation” in nursing mothers. So families are afraid to use DDT, and millions die from preventable malaria, while still more millions suffer permanent brain or liver damage from the disease. Would it also oppose cancer-curing chemotherapy because it causes hair loss and reduced resistance to infections?

Modern instruments can detect chemicals in mere parts per billion (the equivalent of a few seconds in 32 years) or even parts per trillion (a few seconds in 32,000 years). That’s hardly a threat to human health.

But Luddite eco-imperialists and über-organic food activists stridently oppose any manmade fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides, while saying “natural” pesticides commonly used by organic farmers are safe. In reality, copper sulfate can kill humans in lower doses per kilogram of body weight than aspirin, and exposure to rotenone causes Parkinson’s Disease-like symptoms in rats and can also kill humans.

UN Ambassador Nikki Haley, US and EU government agencies, and real human rights advocates should challenge and denounce AgroEcology agitators and their financial enablers for advancing fraudulent claims that perpetuate malnutrition, poverty and human rights abuses in the world’s poorest countries. They should also cut off funding to any government agencies that support AgroEcology nonsense.

Paul Driessen is senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow and author of books and articles on energy, climate change and economic development. David Wojick is an independent analyst specializing in science and logic in public policy.

For original article go to Luddite eco-imperialists claim to be virtuous

Safe Drinking Water Report for Nigeria

Do 80% of Nigerians lack safe drinking water? It’s worse than that

 Reblogged from Africa Check blog 

Claim

Close to 80% of Nigerians lack potable water.

Source: Journalist Dele Sobowale (May 2018)

downplayed

Verdict

Explainer:
90.8% of Nigerians’ household drinking water contaminated by E coli bacteria.

  • A journalist recently claimed that over 80% of Nigerians lack water that is suitable for drinking.
  • A large survey of households published in 2017 found that 90.8% of Nigerians’ drinking water contained some level of E coli bacteria.
  • Only 3.7% of Nigerians had good access to clean water that was completely safe to drink.


 

To continue reading and for more details, see the original article at Africa Check

Additional Information:

The Table in the article is from  Nigeria Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2016-17Survey Finding Report October, 2017″

The global MICS programme was developed by UNICEF in the 1990s as an international household survey programme to support countries in the collection of internationally comparable data on a wide range of indicators on the situation of children and women.

Slow Sand Filters for water purification

Slow sand filters are one of the easiest ways to clean water of pathogens and colloidal particles. Building a slow sand filter for home use requires little beyond local materials. A good manual I found that explains the finer points of operation and construction is “Biosand Filter Construction Manual” through CAWST Center for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology that can be downloaded as a pdf file at https://resources.cawst.org/construction-manual/a90b9f50/biosand-filter-construction-manual 

UV purification of drinking water

UV from sunlight will kill most bacteria and parasites in six to ten hours in clear plastic one to two liter soda or water bottles if the water is clear. Prefiltering is recommended. Laying bottles on a reflective surface will enhance purification. Larger bottles are not recommended because UV from sunlight is reduced by traveling through a greater depth of water. The larger the bottle, the longer it takes to purify. Source of the image is UNICEF

Additional water filtration and purification information is available in my book Saving Africa from Lies That Kill on Amazon and on this blog site.


 

Africa – Six Countries Lauded for Malaria Progress — Africa Research Online

A surge in cases in 2016 prompted WHO to announce that progress against the disease had stalled. More resources must be invested in the fight, leaders and experts say. Elsewhere, community health workers recruited in their own remote communities have seen great success Zimbabwe was honoured on January 28th for leading the way to a […]

via Africa – Six Countries Lauded for Malaria Progress — Africa Research Online

Developing countries need immediate solutions to problems

Developing Countries need Immediate Solutions to Long Term Problems
Clean water well with manual pump

The ultimate aim of infrastructure and economic development should be to connect all rural villages to the electrical grid with vehicle passable roads for access to markets, schools and medical facilities. However, this will take time, so other immediate actions are needed to improve the lives of the rural poor, starting with education and access to clean water for all.

 Immediate Solutions
  1. Education
  2. Clean Water
  3. Sanitation
  4. Insect and disease control
  5. Roads
  6. Electricity

 Summary of Short Term Solutions: (Note each item is discussed in greater detail in earlier blog posts and chapters of the book Saving Africa from Lies that Kill: How Myths about the Environment and Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries )

  1. Education. The number one need of these people is education. All other improvements spring from that knowledge. For example, with a knowledge and understanding that invisible microbes and worm eggs cause disease, measures can be undertaken to reduce or eliminate them from water, food and surroundings. If the people believe diseases are caused by witchcraft or other capricious magic, there is no incentive to improve their infrastructure. Once they understand that there is a logical cause for diseases, improvements will be inevitable. Education can also teach childcare and literacy, as well as agricultural and trade skills.
  2. Clean Water. This can be accomplished without electricity by inhabitants if they are shown how. Clean water wells, low sand dams, slow sand filters or similar clean water resources will go a long way toward eliminating the number one killer of infants and young children, diarrhea from contaminated water. If you understood that giving your babies and toddlers contaminated surface water could make them very sick or kill them, you would gladly do whatever it takes to avoid that source or to purify the water before drinking it, and you would want to help provide and maintain other sources of clean water. They would too.
  3. Sanitation. Digging pit toilets can end open defecation and disposal of raw human waste in fields, which can reduce water contamination, illness and parasites from these sources. Human and animal wastes can still be used on fields for fertilizer, but only after composting for months or a year to eliminate harmful microbes and worm eggs. Ending open defecation and wearing shoes can end most worm infestations. Composting before using manure has an added bonus because raw or “green” manure can harm plants unless allowed time to decompose. Otherwise it can “burn” plants. NOTE: “green manure” as used here is historical terminology for poorly decomposed or raw manure. Under new terminology, green manure refers to plant material that is composted.
  4. Insect and Disease Control. Here again, education is important for understanding measures to prevent mosquito breeding and to protect themselves from bites. DDT and other insecticides offer real hope for reducing or eliminating insect vectored diseases. Bed nets treated with insecticides will reduce bites on sleeping people, but that is only part of the answer. Flies, fleas, lice, ticks and mites also carry many diseases, so elimination of these insects from within the home is important. Diseases and parasites can be cured with medicines and medical facilities, ending the cycle of spreading diseases.
  5. Roads. Passable roads are important to break the isolation trap. Many road improvements can be done gradually by villagers if there are enough healthy people and incentives to do the work. Roads are important to be able to get to medical facilities and for access to markets to sell their crops.
  6. Electricity. Access to electricity or gas for cooking and heating can reduce indoor air pollution from bio-based cooking fires and facilitate water purification for homes, schools, clinics and hospitals. With electricity, houses can be closed against insect entry by using screens and fans for cooling. With electricity, refrigeration is possible for safe storage of foods. Electrification usually needs input from outside the village to accomplish. Mini and micro loans can be used to build local low capacity hydroelectric dams or diesel power plants and medium to low voltage transmission lines locally. All other short-term solutions listed here can be accomplished very quickly by knowledgeable, healthy, and trained inhabitants. Again, education is the key. Teaching local people how the do these things will go a long way toward raising their standard of living, improving their quality of life, lowering under-five mortality and raising life expectancy.

See next blog post for longer term solutions to improve health of the rural poor and raise the economy beyond extreme poverty.

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If you like this post share it with your friends, and sign up to follow my blog by email at http://Savingafricafromliesthatkill.com. Thank you.

The book: Saving Africa from Lies that Kill: How Myths about the Environment and Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries is available in print and eBook online at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million and in bookstores. If you like the book, please leave a review online at Amazon.com or other outlet.

This is the second in my Modern Mythology Series. My first book, Perverted Truth Exposed: How Progressive Philosophy has Corrupted Science was published in 2016. It is available in print and ebook, on line only, through World Net Daily store, Amazon, Books-A-Million and Barnes & Noble.  See the companion blog at www.realscienceblog.com  for related posts and pages.

 

New book: Saving Africa from Lies that Kill – now you can help end the misery

The Book: Saving Africa from Lies that Kill: How Myths about the Environment and Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries.

Now you can help end the unnecessary misery in Africa and other developing countries. No, not just by throwing money at the problem; rather, you can help advocate to end the stagnation caused by outdated wrong attitudes and practices. Africa needs Education, Employment, Investment, Infrastructure and Disease Control to bring them into the 21st century. Africa can grow new burgeoning markets, a source of new goods, new business opportunities and a new workforce for existing businesses, which can break the hold of Chinese goods and services. Investment, rather than foreign aid to corrupt governments is the key, as well as ending counterproductive practices by international organizations.

From the back cover:   How Myths about the Environment and overpopulation are destroying third world countries

In Saving Africa From Lies That Kill, Kay Kiser exposes the long-standing crimes committed against developing nations by the United Nations, World Bank, USAID and Planned Parenthood. Under their guise of “aid,” these organizations mire the underprivileged in isolation, poverty, sickness, and ignorance. In her book, Kiser argues:

  • Poverty, not overpopulation, causes environmental damage. Higher standards of living and lower infant mortality can improve the environment and stabilize the population.
  • Developing nations need access to reliable electricity in order to end energy poverty. This will, in turn, provide clean water, develop transportation, and power hospitals, homes and industrial investment.
  • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re weakened from malaria, parasites and dysentery. They need insect and disease control for a healthy workforce.
  • The Green Revolution and modern agriculture can feed everyone and end deforestation.

Fortunately, you can do something about the problem–and Kiser shows you how.

********************************************

Available online and in book stores everywhere. In print and eBook through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million.  Note: some bookstores may not have it yet, but asking for them to order it for you will help to get it on the shelves faster.

After reading the book, please remember to review it online; share it with a friend and do your part to end bad practices. Visit my blog for more information to sign up for email updates at https://savingafricafromliesthatkill.com/  , and like my Facebook page.

 

Anti-humanism, Environmentalism and the Overpopulation Myth

Saving Africa from Lies that Kill – New Book to Help Solve Old Problems

Saving Africa from Lies that Kill: How Myths about the Environment and Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries is a new book exposing the abuses of the poor in developing countries by international organizations that keep them from developing beyond their primitive state.  These agencies include UN agencies such as UNESCO, UNFPA, WHO and IPCC; the World Bank, USAID, International Planned Parenthood, Population Council, WWF, (Worldwide Fund for Nature, formerly World Wildlife Foundation), The Club of Rome, European Union Food Safety Authority, and Green Peace.. 

Based on environmental, climate change and overpopulation myths these organizations advocate population control quotas in exchange for foreign aid, and block the improvements that could reduce infant and child mortality, reduce and treat endemic diseases, provide electricity, clean water and sanitation, roads, railroads and airports, encourage investment and generally raise their economy and standard of living. 

These myths and the actions based on them are actually long standing colonialist/ communist/ socialist agendas to control the people and stop progress. Communist propaganda falsely paints these improvements as exploitive and harmful rather than building the economy.  Often, corrupt local governments are complicit and profit from the programs, reaping most of the foreign aid dollars. Although Africa has been used as the “poster child” in my book, the same principles apply to impoverished areas in other developing countries. Here are some important facts from the book.

  •  Poverty, not overpopulation is the cause of environmental damage.  Raising the standard of living and preventing high infant mortality will allow for better stewardship of the environment and stabilize the population.
  • Modern agricultural practices would eliminate deforestation from slash and burn subsistence agriculture, which depletes the soil. 
  •  High yield crops, first introduced in the Green Revolution of the 1960s, and genetically enhanced crops (GMO) that are higher in nutrition and more disease and drought resistant have made it possible to feed everyone. The European Union has banned imports from countries that grow GMO crops so many developing countries are forced to pass up this opportunity.  Starvation and malnutrition are often linked to corrupt governments and denial of these improvements to the rural poor.
  • Medical clinics are overstocked with sterilization, abortion and contraceptive products, but often lack emergency equipment and basic medicines for malaria, intestinal worms, and other endemic diseases.
  • Energy poverty is a major problem.  Environmentalists have prevented over 200 hydroelectric dams in Africa alone.  Africa has more than enough hydroelectric capacity for the foreseeable future, but few dams have been developed. India has solved most of its energy poverty with hydroelectric power. 
  • With electricity from hydroelectric dams or fossil fuel plants, other rural development is possible including roads and railroads, irrigation of fields, purified water, sanitary waste treatment, natural gas and electricity for homes, small businesses, agriculture, hospitals and industry. 
  • Water behind dams could provide plenty or water for homes, agriculture and industry, which is contrary to the environmentalists’ water shortage myth. 
  • Climate change agreements only support solar and wind power, which are unreliable and intermittent so they can’t be used as primary power for hospitals or industry. These poor countries can’t afford to settle for such luxuries. They need reliable power now.
  • Education is the most important element for clean water, sanitation and disease prevention.  Even without electrically powered water and sewage systems, with a knowledge of  invisible microbes, people can be taught how to dig wells, filter and purify water, make and use soap, and build toilets to end open defecation and use of raw feces on fields and in streams.
  • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re anemic and weakened from malaria, parasites and diarrhea. 80% of diseases are from insects. DDT and cheap medicines could end most of this and provide a healthy work force for development. 
  • Extensive research shows that DDT is harmless to humans and the environment, but it has been demonized to prevent its use in supposedly overpopulated, underdeveloped countries by population control advocates.  See references below.

 Solutions to these problems, which are self-evident from the list above, include exposing the organizational abuses and garnering assistance from both charitable organizations and investment by private industry to build infrastructure and to educate people in hygiene, modern agriculture, mining, technology, building and mechanical trades and small business administration. Foreign aid is only a Band-Aid that can only alleviate immediate emergency needs.  Investment, along with Employment, Education, Infrastructure and Disease Control, will end this unnecessary misery.

The last chapter highlights the many ways you can help.

References:

Related post:  DDT Needed Now in Underdeveloped Countries

Edwards, J. Gordon. “DDT: A Case Study in Scientific Fraud.” Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons Volume 9 Number 3 Fall 2004.  at http://www.jpands.org/vol9no3/edwards.pdf

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Available online and in book stores everywhere. In print and eBook through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million.  Note: some bookstores may not have it yet, but asking for them to order it for you may help to get it on the shelves faster.

After reading the book, please remember to review it online at any of the online stores above; share it with a friend and do your part to end bad practices. Like my Facebook page. Visit my blog for more information and to sign up for email updates at https://savingafricafromliesthatkill.com/

 

 

FREE: Amazon Kindle giveaway of my new book – Black Friday – Monday

This free Amazon Kindle giveaway offer won’t last long, so hurry to order your free Kindle eBook today!  click here to download your copy. Share this with friends and family.

Saving Africa from Lies that Kill: How Myths about the Environment and Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries shows how you can help end the unnecessary misery in Africa and other developing countries. No, not just by throwing money at the problem; rather, you can help advocate to end the stagnation caused by outdated wrong attitudes and practices. Africa needs Education, Employment, Investment, Infrastructure and Disease Control to bring them into the 21st century. Africa can grow new burgeoning markets, a source of new goods, new business opportunities and a new workforce for existing businesses, which can break the hold of Chinese goods and services. Investment, rather than foreign aid to corrupt governments is the key, as well as ending counterproductive practices by international organizations.

From the back cover:   How Myths about the Environment and overpopulation are destroying third world countries

In Saving Africa From Lies That Kill, Kay Kiser exposes the long-standing crimes committed against developing nations by the United Nations, World Bank, USAID and Planned Parenthood. Under their guise of “aid,” these organizations mire the underprivileged in isolation, poverty, sickness, and ignorance. In her book, Kiser argues:

  • Poverty, not overpopulation, causes environmental damage. Higher standards of living and lower infant mortality can improve the environment and stabilize the population.
  • Developing nations need access to reliable electricity in order to end energy poverty. This will, in turn, provide clean water, develop transportation, and power hospitals, homes and industrial investment.
  • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re weakened from malaria, parasites and dysentery. They need insect and disease control for a healthy workforce.
  • The Green Revolution and modern agriculture can feed everyone and end deforestation.

Fortunately, you can do something about the problem–and Kiser shows you how.

****************************************

Also available online and in book stores everywhere. In print and eBook through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million. 

After reading the book, please remember to review it online; share it with a friend and do your part to end bad practices. On Facebook, like my page HERE to receive updates, and visit my blog for more information and to sign up for email updates at https://savingafricafromliesthatkill.com/

Thank Goodness for the Industrial Revolution — Big Picture News, Informed Analysis

Long the whipping boy of environmentalists, the Industrial Revolution lifted humanity out of misery and squalor.

See chart below and continue reading via Thank Goodness for the Industrial Revolution — Big Picture News, Informed Analysis

It’s here! Saving Africa from Lies that Kill – new book just released

Now you can help end the unnecessary misery in Africa and other developing countries. No, not just by throwing money at the problem; rather, you can help advocate to end the stagnation caused by outdated wrong attitudes and practices. Africa needs Education, Employment, Investment, Infrastructure and Disease Control to bring them into the 21st century. Africa can grow new burgeoning markets, a source of new goods, new business opportunities and a new workforce for existing businesses, which can break the hold of Chinese goods and services. Investment, rather than foreign aid to corrupt governments is the key, as well as ending counterproductive practices by international organizations.

From the back cover:   How Myths about the Environment and overpopulation are destroying third world countries

In Saving Africa From Lies That Kill, Kay Kiser exposes the long-standing crimes committed against developing nations by the United Nations, World Bank, USAID and Planned Parenthood. Under their guise of “aid,” these organizations mire the underprivileged in isolation, poverty, sickness, and ignorance. In her book, Kiser argues:

  • Poverty, not overpopulation, causes environmental damage. Higher standards of living and lower infant mortality can improve the environment and stabilize the population.
  • Developing nations need access to reliable electricity in order to end energy poverty. This will, in turn, provide clean water, develop transportation, and power hospitals, homes and industrial investment.
  • Africans aren’t lazy; they’re weakened from malaria, parasites and dysentery. They need insect and disease control for a healthy workforce.
  • The Green Revolution and modern agriculture can feed everyone and end deforestation.

Fortunately, you can do something about the problem–and Kiser shows you how.

Available online and in book stores everywhere. In print and eBook through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million. 

After reading the book, please remember to review it online; share it with a friend and do your part to end bad practices. Visit my blog for more information and sign up for email updates at https://savingafricafromliesthatkill.com/