Investment Opportunities in Africa

African Economic Development through Foreign Investment

Rand Merchant Bank report, “Where to Invest in Africa,” among other business information services, ranks African countries for their business environment including ease of doing business and a corruption index to help foreign and domestic investors identify good investments. Most of the data comes from UNCTAD, UN Conference on Trade and Development, or other public sources but is compiled to help potential investors. Rand Merchant Bank is an investment bank headquartered in South Africa. RMB “Where to Invest in Africa” brochure can be downloaded without charge by those seriously interested in learning about investing in Africa  at https://www.rmb.co.za/where-to-invest-in-africa-2018-edition/

African Development Bank Group is another source of economic and investment information, among other sources. You can download the brochure “African Economic Outlook 2018” for free at https://www.afdb.org/en/knowledge/publications/african-economic-outlook/. In addition to private investment and business information services, you can find financial information about any countries or regions through the International Monetary Fund, IMF, at www.imf.org, the World Bank, at www.worldbank.org and UN Conference on Trade and Development, UNCTAD, at http://unctad.org, which publishes an annual World Investment Report. Most of the information in the private investment and financial databases are summaries from one of these public sources.

Personal remittances that immigrants send back home are an important cash flow into the economy for most of the countries in Africa. Remittances to families in the impoverished areas benefit the most from it, but it helps the overall economy. Let me give you an example closer to home.  Mexico officially receives $26.1 billion in remittances sent back to families by Mexican immigrants, mostly from the United States. That’s roughly 2.5 percent of Mexico’s GDP, which is a significant contribution to the country’s economy. Generally, remittances have been on the rise since 2000 worldwide due to increased migration from poor countries to developed countries. For this reason, it is beneficial for developing countries to encourage migration.

Sampling of Top 500 Companies and Organizations that Invest in Africa

 

 

Table 1: Top Ten Recipients of Foreign Direct Investments in 2016

Country Percent of Total Foreign Direct Investments Year Over Year Percentage Change
1 Angola (US$14.4bn) 24.2% -11.2%
2 Egypt (US$8.1bn) 13.7% 17.1%
3 Nigeria (US$4.4bn) 7.5% 45.2%
4 Ghana (US$4.4bn) 7.5% 45.2%
5 Ethiopia (US$3.2bn) 5.4% 45.7%
6 Mozambique (US$3.0bn) 5.2% -20.0%
7 Morocco (US$2.3bn) 3.9% -28.7%
8 South Africa (US$2.3bn) 3.8% 31.3%
9 Congo (US$2.0bn) 3.4% 7.5%
10 Algeria (US$1.5bn) 2.6% 17.1%

77.2 percent of all FDI in Africa is included in these top ten countries. Countries suffering from violence and political unrest account for the reductions in the table above.

Source: UN Conference on Trade and Development, (UNCTAD)

 

“A number of emerging and developed markets acquired a keen eye for African assets in 2016, with capital investments from the Asia-Pacific region firmly outpacing traditional markets . . . Egypt, South Africa and Tanzania were among the largest destinations for Chinese and Japanese investors seeking strategic investments in technology, media and telecommunications (TMT), diversified industrial products (DIP), and the automotive and business services sectors.”                         — Rand Merchant Bank, Where to Invest in Africa, 2018

 Table 2: Top Ten Investors in Africa in 2016

Country Investment
1.      UK US$ 66 billion
2.      US US$ 64 billion
3.      France US$52 billion
4.      China US$32 billion
5.      S. Africa US$26 billion
6.      Italy US$19 billion
7.      Singapore US$17 billion
8.      India US$15 billion
9.      Malasia US$14 billion
10.  Germany US$13 billion

Source: UN Conference on Trade and Development, UNCTAD

 

Table 3: Top Ten Most and Least Corrupt Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa

Rank worldwide Most Corrupt Score Rank worldwide Least Corrupt Score
176 Somalia 10 35 Botswana 60
175 South Sudan 11 38 Cape Verde 59
170 Sudan 14 50 Rwanda 54
168 Guinea-Bissau 16 50 Mauritius 54
164 Eritrea 18 53 Namibia 52
164 Angola 18 62 São Tomé and Principe 46
159 Republic of Congo 20 64 Senegal 45
159 Chad 20 64 South Africa 45
159 CAR 20 70 Ghana 43
159 Burundi 20 72 Burkina Faso 42

Source: Transparency International, Corruption Perceptions Index 2016

 

Table 4: Leading Mineral Production in Africa

Material Percent of world production Countries
Diamonds 73% Botswana 35%, Congo (Kinshasa) 34%, South Africa 17%, Angola, 8%
Gold 89% South Africa 56%, Ghana, 13%, Tanzania, 10%, and Mali, 8%
Uranium 16% Namibia 46%, Niger 44%, South Africa less than 10%
Bauxite (for aluminum) 9% Guinea 95%, Ghana 5%
Steel 2% South Africa 54%, Egypt 32%, Libya 7%, Algeria 6%
Aluminum 5% South Africa 48%, Mozambique 32%, Egypt 14%
Copper 5% Zambia 65%/77%, South Africa 15%/19%, Congo (Kinshasa) 13%/0%, Egypt 0%/3%
Platinum/Palladium 92% South Africa 97% / 96%
Coal 5% South Africa 99%

Source: Wikipedia “Mineral Industry in Africa”

 

Figure 5: Top Five of the Twenty-nine Stock Exchanges in Africa

Exchange Market Capitalizations Number of Listings
1. Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) $987 billion 388
2. Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) $44 billion 176
3. Egyptian Stock Exchange (EGX) $46 billion 222
4. Casablanca Stock Exchange (Casa SE) $48 billion 75
5. Namibian Stock Exchange (NSX) $76 billion 36

Source: © Copyright 2018| Nairametrics

 

Table 6: Intended use of selected sovereign bond issues in selected African countries

Country, Year Value

(M US$)

Intended Use
Côte d’Ivoire, 2014 750 Public investment, especially in health care and education
Côte d’Ivoire, 2015 1,000 National Development Plan (NDP), which focuses on infrastructure, education, health care, and poverty reduction
Ethiopia, 2014 1,000 Infrastructure, notably the Renaissance Dam
Ghana, 2013 750 Capital expenditure and refinancing of public debt to reduce the cost of borrowing
Kenya, 2014 2,000 Infrastructure projects and repayment of a $600 million loan that matured in August 2014
Nigeria, 2013 1,000 Projects in the electricity sector, which is undergoing privatization, and support of the shift from domestic borrowing toward cheaper foreign credit
Rwanda, 2013 400 Construction of a 28-megawatt hydropower plant, construction of a hotel, and payment of some state-owned RwandAir debt
Senegal, 2014 500 Construction of a major highway and the upgrading and repair of energy infrastructure

Source: AfDB compilation, based on various sources.

“African Economic Outlook 2018,” African Development Bank

The new hope for Africa involves improving infrastructure, attracting foreign and domestic investment, and ending internationally funded government corruption that discourages investment and permits interference by international programs that keep populations low and the rural poor isolated, ignorant, sick and helpless. Governments that rely on taxes from a growing economy are more accountable to the people, so that they will be prompted to develop infrastructure, such as roads and electricity, and maintain political and economic stability, all of which will encourage increased investments and grow the economy. Corruption is the number one deterrent to global investment, so it is important to end foreign aid that props up corrupt politicians, clean up the government and stabilize the economy.

*****************************************

If you like this post share it with your friends, and sign up to follow my blog by email at http://Savingafricafromliesthatkill.com. Thank you.

The book: Saving Africa from Lies that Kill: How Myths about the Environment and Overpopulation are Destroying Third World Countries is available in print and eBook online at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million and in bookstores. If you like the book, please leave a review online at Amazon.com.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.